Don Haderle retires

David Seibert

Don Haderle retires
Acc. to
http://www.mercurynews.com/mld/mercurynews/business/10664195.htm

Database father retires, to polka: Don Haderle, 61, the father of IBM's
flagship database software, DB2, retired last week after 37 years with the
computer giant.

The IBM fellow went out in style. Feted by more than 500 of his colleagues
at IBM's Silicon Valley Lab, Haderle and his wife, Gail, treated the crowd
to their polka steps, one of their favorite pastimes.

Haderle joined IBM in 1968 as a programmer and, 10 years later, joined the
fledgling team that would eventually create DB2. Their work and others'
spawned the relational database industry, including the formation of Oracle,
which beat IBM to the punch by launching its first relational database in
1979.

Haderle almost did not join IBM. He graduated from UC-Berkeley in 1967 with
an undergraduate degree in economics, but being a newlywed with a child, he
couldn't afford to continue on to get a doctorate. Among his first job
offers was to manage the lingerie department at a department store.

Because of his significant course load in math and physics, however, he was
appealing to recruiters looking for programmers before there was any kind of
computer science curriculum.

Polka and golf will play a big part in his retirement, along with his two
grandchildren. ``Gail and I intend to dance and have fun for three months in
the desert, visited by grandkids and other family,'' Haderle said.

If you didn't ever hear Don speak, you missed a great one.

See his interview at
http://www-128.ibm.com/developerworks/db2/library/techarticle/0304haderle/03
04haderle.html

At the first DB2 Tech Conference in 1991(?), I had seen Don speak and
recognized him later in the expo at the back of a demo by a young woman
showing Candle's new Explain tool. I saw Don working his way up to the
front of the group in the booth. Eventually he was standing right next to
the woman presenting the demo. Just before that, I noticed Don tucking his
name tag into his pocket. The poor woman turned to Don, trying to tout the
value of the tool's ability to translate Explain table mumbo-jumbo into
plain English. She said to Don, you probably don't know what any of these
values mean, do you? And Don humbly said, I know what a couple of them
are.... and turned around and smiled to those who recognized him.

Maybe Roger could share a tale or 2.

Dave



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Slot J.P.

Re: Don Haderle retires
(in response to David Seibert)
Dave,

I remember Don speaking as keynote at IDUG 2000 in Geneva. As I remember correctly
we were having a worktitle "Don Haderly's Crystal Ball". As we said it doesn't
matter what he talks about, it's always brilliant...
As he came at the conference he had brought his brother-in-law with him. Who had
a profession as pathologist. We had a good time and enjoyed his keynote.
We went out for dinner and everyone wanted to join, especially some IBM specialist
who was very much impressed with Don. As we went out I ordered tartar and the IBM
specialist did the same. When asked by the waiter I asked for a raw. The IBM specialist
did te same. When the dishes arrived the meat hadn't been anywere close to a fire.
Don and his brother looked at the dishes an his brother-in-law remarked "I do see some
resemblance.."
Never did I see an IBM specialist turn blue that fast..

I'm fortunate to have met him and I wish him the best of luck and humorous times ahead
together with his family.

Regards,

Jaap Slot
ICT Architect




-----Oorspronkelijk bericht-----
Van: DB2 Data Base Discussion List [mailto:[login to unmask email]namens
Seibert, Dave
Verzonden: dinsdag 18 januari 2005 13:00
Aan: [login to unmask email]
Onderwerp: [DB2-L] Don Haderle retires


Acc. to
http://www.mercurynews.com/mld/mercurynews/business/10664195.htm

Database father retires, to polka: Don Haderle, 61, the father of IBM's
flagship database software, DB2, retired last week after 37 years with the
computer giant.

The IBM fellow went out in style. Feted by more than 500 of his colleagues
at IBM's Silicon Valley Lab, Haderle and his wife, Gail, treated the crowd
to their polka steps, one of their favorite pastimes.

Haderle joined IBM in 1968 as a programmer and, 10 years later, joined the
fledgling team that would eventually create DB2. Their work and others'
spawned the relational database industry, including the formation of Oracle,
which beat IBM to the punch by launching its first relational database in
1979.

Haderle almost did not join IBM. He graduated from UC-Berkeley in 1967 with
an undergraduate degree in economics, but being a newlywed with a child, he
couldn't afford to continue on to get a doctorate. Among his first job
offers was to manage the lingerie department at a department store.

Because of his significant course load in math and physics, however, he was
appealing to recruiters looking for programmers before there was any kind of
computer science curriculum.

Polka and golf will play a big part in his retirement, along with his two
grandchildren. ``Gail and I intend to dance and have fun for three months in
the desert, visited by grandkids and other family,'' Haderle said.

If you didn't ever hear Don speak, you missed a great one.

See his interview at
http://www-128.ibm.com/developerworks/db2/library/techarticle/0304haderle/03
04haderle.html

At the first DB2 Tech Conference in 1991(?), I had seen Don speak and
recognized him later in the expo at the back of a demo by a young woman
showing Candle's new Explain tool. I saw Don working his way up to the
front of the group in the booth. Eventually he was standing right next to
the woman presenting the demo. Just before that, I noticed Don tucking his
name tag into his pocket. The poor woman turned to Don, trying to tout the
value of the tool's ability to translate Explain table mumbo-jumbo into
plain English. She said to Don, you probably don't know what any of these
values mean, do you? And Don humbly said, I know what a couple of them
are.... and turned around and smiled to those who recognized him.

Maybe Roger could share a tale or 2.

Dave



The contents of this e-mail are intended for the named addressee only. It
contains information that may be confidential. Unless you are the named
addressee or an authorized designee, you may not copy or use it, or disclose
it to anyone else. If you received it in error please notify us immediately
and then destroy it.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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Roger Miller

Re: Don Haderle retires
(in response to Slot J.P.)
Don was a good speaker, but there were moments. His real gift as the
chief architect of DB2 and then as the CTO for Data Management is a deep
understanding, with both breadth and scope. His memory is amazing, going
back to a module he had not seen for 10 years and remembering the logic
and rationale. He could also talk easily at the level of CEOs, as they
played golf together.

During the early years of V1R1, he worked on coding during the day, and
then used the machines to test and debug on second shift. The big machine
had 3 MIPS back then. He directed the advanced technologies for IBM's
database management systems: performance, availability, distributed, data
sharing, web, ... Collaborating with IBM researchers as they invented the
relational database management system, Don innovated and led the
engineering work that made DB2 into a robust DBMS capable of serving in
the most crucial business environments. He saw many of the key customer
needs and started us working on them, then often could solve some of the
most difficult problems. It's hard to count all his inventions and
patents.

Don gave a lecture last week too, and the theme is one I've heard before.

1. Listen to what customers really want.
2. Deliver business solutions faster.
3. Reduce the cost of the solution.
4. Make it work!
5. Cycle back to step 1.

We shared a lot of stories this past week. Don also worked well with
people. Many of today's key architects were mentored by Don. Building a
DBMS must be about a large team, and Don fostered the broad teamwork that
was required. There is an old adage that success has many fathers. Many
people claim to be the father of DB2. Don was the mother of DB2, carrying
the baby through many years, helping it grow, and building the team for
the next decades.

Roger Miller

On Tue, 18 Jan 2005 14:54:04 +0100, Slot, JP (Jaap)
<[login to unmask email]> wrote:

>Dave,
>
>I remember Don speaking as keynote at IDUG 2000 in Geneva. As I remember
correctly
>we were having a worktitle "Don Haderly's Crystal Ball". As we said it
doesn't
>matter what he talks about, it's always brilliant...
>As he came at the conference he had brought his brother-in-law with him.
Who had
>a profession as pathologist. We had a good time and enjoyed his keynote.
>We went out for dinner and everyone wanted to join, especially some IBM
specialist
>who was very much impressed with Don. As we went out I ordered tartar and
the IBM
>specialist did the same. When asked by the waiter I asked for a raw. The
IBM specialist
>did te same. When the dishes arrived the meat hadn't been anywere close
to a fire.
>Don and his brother looked at the dishes an his brother-in-law
remarked "I do see some
>resemblance.."
>Never did I see an IBM specialist turn blue that fast..
>
>I'm fortunate to have met him and I wish him the best of luck and
humorous times ahead
>together with his family.
>
>Regards,
>
>Jaap Slot
>ICT Architect
>
>
>
>
>-----Oorspronkelijk bericht-----
>Van: DB2 Data Base Discussion List [mailto:[login to unmask email]namens
>Seibert, Dave
>Verzonden: dinsdag 18 januari 2005 13:00
>Aan: [login to unmask email]
>Onderwerp: [DB2-L] Don Haderle retires
>
>
>Acc. to
>http://www.mercurynews.com/mld/mercurynews/business/10664195.htm
>
>Database father retires, to polka: Don Haderle, 61, the father of IBM's
>flagship database software, DB2, retired last week after 37 years with the
>computer giant.
>
>The IBM fellow went out in style. Feted by more than 500 of his colleagues
>at IBM's Silicon Valley Lab, Haderle and his wife, Gail, treated the crowd
>to their polka steps, one of their favorite pastimes.
>
>Haderle joined IBM in 1968 as a programmer and, 10 years later, joined the
>fledgling team that would eventually create DB2. Their work and others'
>spawned the relational database industry, including the formation of
Oracle,
>which beat IBM to the punch by launching its first relational database in
>1979.
>
>Haderle almost did not join IBM. He graduated from UC-Berkeley in 1967
with
>an undergraduate degree in economics, but being a newlywed with a child,
he
>couldn't afford to continue on to get a doctorate. Among his first job
>offers was to manage the lingerie department at a department store.
>
>Because of his significant course load in math and physics, however, he
was
>appealing to recruiters looking for programmers before there was any kind
of
>computer science curriculum.
>
>Polka and golf will play a big part in his retirement, along with his two
>grandchildren. ``Gail and I intend to dance and have fun for three months
in
>the desert, visited by grandkids and other family,'' Haderle said.
>
>If you didn't ever hear Don speak, you missed a great one.
>
>See his interview at
>http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/db2/library/techarticle/0304haderle/0304
haderle.html
>
>At the first DB2 Tech Conference in 1991(?), I had seen Don speak and
>recognized him later in the expo at the back of a demo by a young woman
>showing Candle's new Explain tool. I saw Don working his way up to the
>front of the group in the booth. Eventually he was standing right next to
>the woman presenting the demo. Just before that, I noticed Don tucking his
>name tag into his pocket. The poor woman turned to Don, trying to tout the
>value of the tool's ability to translate Explain table mumbo-jumbo into
>plain English. She said to Don, you probably don't know what any of these
>values mean, do you? And Don humbly said, I know what a couple of them
>are.... and turned around and smiled to those who recognized him.
>
>Maybe Roger could share a tale or 2.
>
>Dave
>
>
>
>The contents of this e-mail are intended for the named addressee only. It
>contains information that may be confidential. Unless you are the named
>addressee or an authorized designee, you may not copy or use it, or
disclose
>it to anyone else. If you received it in error please notify us
immediately
>and then destroy it.
>

>
>De informatie opgenomen in dit bericht kan vertrouwelijk zijn en
>is uitsluitend bestemd voor de geadresseerde. Indien u dit bericht
>onterecht ontvangt, wordt u verzocht de inhoud niet te gebruiken en
>de afzender direct te informeren door het bericht te retourneren.
>
>The information contained in this message may be confidential
>and is intended to be exclusively for the addressee. Should you
>receive this message unintentionally, please do not use the contents
>herein and notify the sender immediately by return e-mail.
>

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Welcome to the IDUG DB2-L list. To unsubscribe, go to the archives and home page at http://www.idugdb2-l.org/archives/db2-l.html. From that page select "Join or Leave the list". The IDUG DB2-L FAQ is at http://www.idugdb2-l.org. The IDUG List Admins can be reached at [login to unmask email] Find out the latest on IDUG conferences at http://conferences.idug.org/index.cfm